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    • #69846
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      “From most of the research I’ve been able to find that it’s a little bit of an older kart, not quite vintage but nowhere up to today’s standards”

      I hate to rain on your parade, but the kart is pretty much useless except as a toy.  I would call it “ancient” by competition kart standards.  It’s  is so old that it cannot compete in any recognized race series and a careful track might not even let you take it out, at least not if there’s anybody else out there.  You won’t be able to find new parts for it.

      Most “deals” like this wind up being bad deals, because the time and cost of getting the thing into decent shape winds up exceeding the price of buying a decent race kart in the first place, and then you’re stuck with a slow, out-dated machine.  Unfortunately, there are all kinds of these things around, usually lurking on Craigslist, because the frames are chrome alloy and don’t rust away.

      If you just want something to tool around local alleys and cul-de-sacs at 30 mph, it’ll do.  If you want something track suitable you’ll have to look elsewhere.

    • #68204
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      Drew, it varies with skill and weight, but a 10/83 will work at PSGKA, Richland, SIMA and PGP (if they ever let 2-strokes back).  You might wind up running up one or down one or two in the long run, but this is a good start point.

      As fate would have it,  I have an extra used Leopard 10-tooth clutch drum and sprocket and an extra 83-tooth axle sprocket left over from when I used to run a Leopard.  I’m in Seattle.  PM me if you want to discuss a purchase.

      For new parts, Italian Motors (located in Sumas, WA) is your source for all things and knowledge that is Leopard.  http://www.italianmotorsusa.com.

    • #67229
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      Jose, except for starting from a stand-still, you don’t use the clutch at all.  All upshifts and downshifts are performed without using the clutch.

      My guess is that your clutch cable might be stuck or misadjusted, preventing the clutch from engaging fully.  Also, an upshift reduces torque so it is strange that the engine does not lower rpm’s on upshifts but the rpm’s are increasing for downshifts (I assume).  If the clutch was going to slip it should do it when the torque increases.

      Which leads to my next thought, which is that your upshifts are not upshifts at all.  Sometimes the shifter mechanism can become misadjusted or run into interference with a seat strut.  You pull back on the lever and it seems to move, but in fact there isn’t enough travel to move the tranny into a higher gear.  This used to happen to me on an older shifter (usually mid race, of course) when the engine mount would slip back a bit and the shift rod started hitting a seat strut and couldn’t move far enough anymore.   This only happens on upshifts because that moves the lever on the engine back toward the rear of the kart; there was plenty of room to pull if forward and downshift.

    • #67228
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      If class rules allow it, use a Lithium Ion battery off of e-bay.  Weights about 1 pound and seems to last as long and start as well as a standard bat.  Cost about $80.  Recharges ultra fast.  Should last forever.  Been using one for 2 years on an X-125t with no issues.

    • #67227
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      The short answer is “yes.”  In my experience the standard clips are very stiff and will not fall out if properly installed, but they are hard to install without damaging the clip by making it out-of-round.  I tried an aftermarket plastic c-clip installer but it was too weak for an IAME clip.  I bought the crazy expensive but rock solid, all metal IAME installer and never had another problem.

    • #66018
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      This might give you a start:

      https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1rk9g2gTZVx2iTwF9vHsJlZQr5kQ&hl=en_US

      BTW, the fact that IKF doesn’t have this info at its finger tips, and why you have to resort to pleading to helpful strangers on the internet, might be one clue as to why IKF is in the shape it is in.

    • #63379
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      The short answer is if you are currently wasting your time and money on a sport that you’ll try and give up on in short order, then if you buy an e-bay suit that will be less money wasted than if you bought a good suit, wore it a couple times, and quit.  If you stick with the sport, you’ll want a name-brand suit.  Having said that, I got my first (name brand) suit used off e-bay for $25 and used it for four years.

      I see you’re at Lake Stevens.  There’s a race at SIMA tomorrow (March 26) and the weather forecast is awesome.  Come by, check it out, talk to people, ask questions.

       

    • #61029
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      Gonna disagree, but only partially.  If the track has areas in which late/threshold brake maneuvers are important, you will be faster with front brakes.  But learning to modulate correctly is a whole new skill.  Also, most drivers put too much bias on the fronts thus inhibiting turn-in.  Fronts are an assist to the rear brakes, not the primary source of stopping power.

      I also think fronts are a good idea if you plan to transfer to cars–that heavy almost-all-the-way-though-the-turn trail braking that can be done with a rear-brake only kart doesn’t transfer well to other 4-wheel motorsports.

      Finally, a good compromise is the front brake systems with a foot operated rear brake and a front handbrake on the steering wheel.  It takes some practice but eventually it becomes almost second nature to add or subtract front brake depending on the needs of the particular turn.  I find myself mostly disregarding the handbrake in most turns, but depending on it quite a bit in classic late brakes like a hairpin at the end of a fast straight.

      Worth the $1000?  Depends on the tracks you’ll be at, your skill level, and how badly you want to gain a few tenths.

    • #60392
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      If you want to visit the Pacific Northwest:

      http://www.simaracing.com/instructors

       

    • #57907
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      The MY09 is no different than the earlier motor insofar as a vibration plate is concerned.  Your old one should fit fine.

    • #57512
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      Okay, but you already know that the cheapest thing about racing is buying the car ;)

      here are some general guidelines:

      1.  Chassis should be year 2003 or newer, as anything older than that gets much harder to find parts for.  Axle size can be 40 or 50mm.

      2.  If you get a shifter, a honda is the preferred motor just because of parts availability for karting applications.

      3.  If you get a single speed, it should be a Rotax or Leopard (IAME/Parrilla) for parts/service availability

      4  In my experience, the hardest thing to find parts for on an older kart is the brakes, as there a dozens of different caliper designs and they all require a different pad size/shape.  You might want to look into that before you buy.

      5.  Most of the stuff on your local craigslist is worn out crap that will not meet items 1-3, but if you look hard and long enough you’ll probably find something.

       

    • #57423
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      Brian, what’s your budget?  You probably know that speed costs money.  If your budget is $5000 it’s a lot easier for you to locate something suitable than if your budget is $1500.

    • #57296
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      I’m with Walt on this one.  That only track that thing should be on is a fast track to the scrap yard. A shifter is a fast, hairy and unforgiving beast that has to be on top condition to be run safely.  You’ll never get there with that POS.  Run an LO206 to get your feet wet.  Frankly, at 250lbs you’re probably never going to win anything anyway, even if you have Lewis Hamilton talent, so don’t worry about being underpowered.  Like I tell myself and all my oversized buds:  Remember those little guys we used to push around on the football field and take to the hoop in high school?  This sport is their revenge.

    • #57219
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      Sorry, I can’t help you about the ports.

      The slide itself doesn’t adjust, but the slide needle can be moved up and down using the clip that holds it in place.  The needle itself also can be changed.  This is a minor/subtle adjustment and not something that should concern you at this point.  If I were you I’d just take it to the track, put my foot in it, and see what happens.  Bring a friend and full safety gear please.

    • #57089
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      While the Delorto is a better carb, I think that’s a bit too expensive a path for you to run down right now, since you’re clearly just getting your feet wet.  If you are just puttering down the street you’re going to be overcarbed even with the Delorto.  You need to take it out on a real track.

      Switch to a 52 low jet and a 172 main.  That will lean you out quite a bit but still should be plenty safe.  Check the plug after a few laps–black is rich but at least it won’t explode, brown is what you want, and white/chalky means too lean.  Move up or down from this baseline setting as required.  If you meet other drivers at your local track, they can probably help too.

      Incidentally, forgive my preaching but driving a shifter kart down the street is a real bad idea.  Maybe its okay to make sure the brakes actually work, no parts are falling off, etc., but in addition to being dangerous and illegal, it will give you almost no useful data.  My Skip Barber instructor said the next step up from a shifter is an Indy car.  How much data would we get puttering a Dallera-Chevy around in the local cul-de-sac ?  You’ve got a real race car and it needs a real race track.

      BTW, based on the photo, the vent  below the carb looks like it is tapped into the crankcase and is a vent for running a fuel pump off the pulse.  If your pump is running off another vent then plug it.

       

    • #56932
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      Where are you located and are you running sprint or road race?  Honestly, it’s been several years since I ran a shifter and then it was a modified Honda not a YZ, but you look to be seriously oversized on your jets for a sprint track, even at sea level, especially if you aren’t an experienced driver.  Rejetting might cure a big part of your problem.

    • #56848
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      The 39mm  carb is the “correct” size for a 125 shifter.  I use quote marks because in IMHO this means it is wildly oversized unless you know what you’re doing and are running at or near the kart’s maximum potential.  Otherwise, the engine will seem sluggish and too rich.  This is one of many reasons it’s usually not a good idea to start out with a shifter kart–the carb is not forgiving for those at the beginning end of the learning curve.  The cure for what seems to be a carb problem often is to stick your foot in it and to drive faster, which may mean driving over your head.

      The pump around system is one approach to curing a perceived issue with the float sticking in high-g corners–the kart sees g forces that are unobtainable on a bike.  A lot of very fast shifter drivers that don’t believe in pump arounds and do fine with floats.

    • #56645
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      You need to provide way more information; so far you’ve only told us it is a “go kart,” which is sort of like saying you have a “car” and want us to tell you, based solely on that word, what the tire size should be.  This forum is mainly used by people who run modern European-spec competition road racing karts.  If you have a US spec oval kart or an off-road kart, the answer will be different.

    • #53939
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      A couple of heavier guys have run Dragons in the SIMA masters class.  It’s the the Nordam direct drive engine but with a clutch, which is pretty much the Leopard bottom end with a special head.  No relation to the X30 that I can see.

      Not a lot of low end, but when SIMA ran the high speed track configurations the Dragons were untouchable, even with a substantial weight penalty.  I think it would be dominating in road racing. TaG USA recognizes it as an option for “IAME only classes” like the IAME cup.  But other than club racing at SIMA, I haven’t seen or heard of it being used anywhere in North America.

    • #52369
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      This suit is the best I’ve found so far, made by Oakley’Sparco to Italian Motor’s specs.  Downside (depending on what & where you race) is that it proclaims “Italkart”.  Upside is it looks swag.

      New Style Italkart / IM Race Suit

    • #52172
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      Unfortunately, the headline and most of the article fails to explain the reason for Fittipaldi’s opinion, which is found in the very last line:
      “A formula car is much heavier than a go-kart and it takes a longer time to move it,” he added. “You need more space; there is a different dynamic.”And this transition, [the drivers] have to understand and respect.”
      This statement is true and has nothing to do with what the headline implies, which is that karting does not teach good racing skills.  Indeed, the comments below the article are filled with the usual twaddle by no-nothings who seem to think the problem is an F3 car is a big step up in performance, when actually its a step down in everything but top speed.  The drivers are used to the hair-trigger handling of a kart, but now they’re piloting a machine with more top speed and carrying more kinetic energy, but which is less responsive in turning and braking.

      That said, I also have to think that the amount of contact allowed in karting, without penalty, has encouraged the type of racing behavior that’s led to the accidents in F3 this year.

    • #51991
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      My WAG is that the spring under the fulcrum is offset and the needle isn’t seating correctly.  Disassemble the carb and try again.  You don’t have to pull the carb off the motor to do this.

    • #51694
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      A member PM’d me for an update so I figured I post it here.

       

      I have 13 hours on the motor now.  I’m totally sold on it so far, and everyone I know who has switched to it has gotten faster as a result. Absolutely no reliability issues–starts easily  every time and goes like crazy as long as you get the jetting right.  Now that summer is hear I barely even run down the battery–it charged in 5 minutes after the last Saturday’s race.

       

      I had fuel consumption issues early on but that turned out to be a jetting issue and now that I’m getting that down the fuel consumption is similar to a Leopard or Rotax.  The engine is very strong from 9000 to the 15500 rpm redline, especially in the midrange.  The weakness is similar to a Rotax in that the power band falls off a cliff below about 6-7000 rpm, so I’ve been in one situation where I had to gear it so I was redlined ¾ of the way down a straight because I needed to keep the rpm’s up on some slow corners.  That said, I turned my fastest laps ever at that track and was right in the hunt for the win.

       

      I’ve had a couple situations where the engine bogged down and semi-stalled due to flooding–the Tryton 27 will dump loads of fuel at low rpm’s and when you get below the power band the intake air velocity goes to hell and that in combination with the Tryton causes flooding.  This hasn’t been a problem for me when racing because I’m always careful to keep the engine from loading up during the formation lap, but a friend of mine who is less attentive to this issue (see below) managed to “stall” during a start and went from 2nd to last in about 3 seconds.

       

      I checked the clutch recently and it looks new.  I’ll probably change it at 15 hours purely as a precaution.

       

      As for factory support, you have to realize that my home track is SIMA which is built next to the Italian Motors (Italkart) North American warehouse.  The X125t is IM’s baby–Mike and Claudio Valiente took a Maxter KF4 motor and modified it to their liking–so I’ve been somewhat of a early adopter for the motor and they are interested in my feedback.  Beyond that, since the motor never breaks there hasn’t been much support to ask for.   We’ve traded a bunch of jetting info because they are trying to build their knowledge of what-works-where.  My experience with IM customer service has always been great and they ship almost everything for free. With the trade-iin program for this motor I don’t see how you can lose, so long as it is legal for the series you are running in.

       

      That said, one of my racing buddies has had less luck than me, primarily because he can’t seem to get the Tryton carb adjusted.  However, he never does any maintenance while I flush my carb after every race weekend and rebuild every 8 hours.  It’s the same carb as on the X30 and I’ve heard a few people bitch about the carb jetting with respect to that motor.  The jetting definitely is touchier than on a Leopard, which was my main motor before the X125, but not nearly as bad as the old mod honda shifter I used to run.  I found a sweet spot and now that I have it, the jetting really doesn’t seem to change much with air density.

       

      These observations are for the “masters” X125t with the Tryton 27mm, not the “senior” one with the Tilitson 23mm (same as a Leopard).  I doubt the Tilitson “floods.”  It sure never did in 4 years of running a Leopard.

    • #67292
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      It’s been awhile since I ran shifter, but IIRC the amount of travel required to upshift increases somewhat as you move up through the gears.  I recall that when I had my problem the first 3-4 gears always were available and the problem was with 5-6.

      Not surprising that the clutch itself is okay.  Honda clutches last forever in this application since you only use them for a start.

    • #66100
      Jim Derrig
      Participant

      I shot my mouth off too soon and apologize to the IKF.

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