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    • #58267
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      I think it will limit field size.  While the intent might be a noble one the end result will probably not be what was expected.  I don’t want that to happen but I think it is inevitable.  The faster guys spend way more time and energy testing things to get everything just right.  This kind of says you don’t deserve your small gains earned through your effort.  Unfortunately the fast guys won’t agree with that.  I sure hope the rule doesn’t actually go into effect.  Time will tell.

    • #52869
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Robert, my reply was in response to the statement…

      “Average amount of weight in a 60 kart field is 34.33 pounds.”

      However I do understand what you are saying now.  You were simply talking about the TAG class.

       

      Mark,

      “I know a lot of S4 guys were not happy about S2 drivers that were much younger bolting on a lot of lead and running against older competition in a class that is a little less competitive.”

      I think you don’t quite respect the level of some of the racers in the S4 class.  Weights being equal top 5 in S4 would be just as competitive as top 5 in any class.

    • #52812
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      ^^^ agreed

    • #52794
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Robert,

      You are speaking of one class.   Not all classes.  You should see how many people in all shifter classes who are in good shape and slim that have to spend too much time and money on titanium, carbon fiber and custom aluminum parts just to get CLOSE to the minimum weight.   Don’t misrepresent data.

      Take weight off and shrink fields.  Sounds like a great idea.  Buy an electric kart stand.  I haven’t lifted a kart in years.  Work smarter, not harder.

    • #52762
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Come to think of it let’s get rid of the bodywork and then we can lower weights.   I’m down with that plan.

    • #52759
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Daniel,

      Dumbest thing I’ve heard.   So because someone is 6’4″ and 190lbs they aren’t fit,  of high caliber, semi-pro or professional capable?   They don’t drive often or shouldn’t be competing nationally?   Your assumption about weight is incorrect.   Not everyone is short and fat with the ability to lose weight to get down to 175lbs or less.

       

      We need to worry about what supports the sport with the most numbers possible.  Who cares about a few extra tenths quicker when it’s all relative.  Everyone is at same weight!  As Richard Petty put it speed is irrelevant,  it’s about the competition.  Last thing karting needs to do is put rules in place that limits it’s growth potential, even at the national level.

    • #52479
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      I think it’s both bodywork and race directing.  I remember NTK being very strict on penalties back in my early days and it shaped my mindset that someone is always watching.  Not all calls are perfect, BUT that is even more reason to make sure you leave no reason for doubt on the table when you decide to make a questionable move.   Never one single answer but officiating is a good start.

    • #52380
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      I think the amount of contact has gone up since the new full rear bumper rule came into play.  Less consequences = more contact.  If you increase the chances that contact will end your race just as much as the person you are planning to shove out of the way then there will be less contact.  IMO

      It is also a matter of experience, respect and race craft.  You generally see good respectful racing towards the front of the field and the further back you go the uglier it gets.  It’s generally the local/regional level racers trying to make their way into the national level scene and are probably used to this kind of racing at their local level.

      Or they drive like a European and think that swerving at you on the straightaway is acceptable.   :/

       

      If you make it towards the front of the pack and drive like an a-hole, chances are you will be dealt with like an a-hole.  Once you learn this lesson, you tend to make smarter decisions.

    • #39489
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Arvind,

      I’m 6’4″. I have been racing for 11 years and I have driven quite a few of the chassis brands available. There is not a chassis for “tall people” and there doesn’t need to be. It’s mostly about setting it up for your height. Seat position is critical and once you get this right everything else will fall in place. The only concern you might have is the need for an extended front porch to move the pedals forward if they are too short for you. Most manufacturers support this option. I used to run an extended front porch and now I do not. It’s a very tight fit but I have made some modifications to make it work for me.

      That being said I have had the most success in the past couple of years on my DR Kart. It has worked very well for me and responded extremely well to setup changes despite my height. If you are looking for a personal recommendation from a fellow tall racer this is the chassis I would suggest. They are also recent world champions as well!

      I would strongly suggest getting a used chassis to start with until you really get your feet wet. You won’t need a new frame if you are just starting out. You might check with Pole Position Karting in Frisco, TX to see if they have any used karts in stock. Feel free to PM me if you have other questions.

    • #39254
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      If you are serious, you will find a way to make weight.

      6’4″ and 185 lbs

      There is a lot of extra weight on your kart if you are willing to spend the time to find it. This year I dropped 15 lbs and another 15 on the kart. I was able to make weight in S2 @ 385 lbs.

    • #39047
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      It will be a small field at best. Open/Modified racing formats have proven time and time again that this format is not sustainable in the long run. With current spec racing formats available with large fields of competitive drivers, these classes generally end up populated with the drivers that are not competitive in the spec classes. It could be fun for a few as long as the expectation for the class is realistic. Karting is already too fragmented as anyone else will tell you.

    • #38703
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      As mentioned above, I move the left seat stay ONLY to adjust the width of the upper region of the seat. My seat slightly compresses in the seat stay to get the fit just right for me. I used a ribtech vest and NO padding in my seat. I snap in like a button with no movement what so ever. Hope this helps.

    • #19626
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      In S4 I would say approximately 30-40% of the filed are on 30mm chassis.  S2 might actually be closer to 50/50.   I always ran a 32 until last year.  I switched to the DR 30mm chassis and it works better for me than any other chassis I have driven in (S4).  I’m also 6’4″.  Most people you ask would say I need a 32mm, but that isn’t the case.

       

    • #18945
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Very great recommendations above.

       

      As a last resort a sex change operation will greatly increase your odds.

       

      Best of luck!

    • #18154
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      I know this is a little off the main topic but I want to touch on some comments made within the thread.  Here are my opinions whatever they are worth.

      As for the split schedule I think it’s very smart.  You have to remember that this race is in Vegas.  It’s an attraction.  Many of the racers that come do so because they can bring their entire family and enjoy this as a race and a fun vacation.  If you keep everyone on the track all day long then they are too tired to enjoy the destination and friends and family members get tired of sitting at the track all day long.  This is also what attracts most of the international competitors.  Vegas is known world wide and everyone wants to come here.  A race is a great excuse to come here as long as you have time to enjoy it as well.  Some would say that this race is only for the best drivers to show up and nothing else matters.  Sure, the top 10 or so of each class shares this mentality which will be the same top 10 at every big race.  However you can not support a series/national event year after year with only the best participating in it.  Look at what happened to STARS of Karting.  I raced with that series during its peak and all the way to its death.  Why?  It got to where it was so serious and expensive that only the drivers that had a chance of finishing top 10 or better would show up because it cost so much money to race and everyone else just stayed home.  You could watch the front guys battle it out but what fun is that when the field is small?  Of course this had a lot to do with the engine rules vs. our now stock spec moto rules.

      I think allowing anyone to show up at the SuperNats or any ProTour race (within reason) is great for the health of this sport.  Making people qualify like Rotax does only frustrates people and eventually will stop racing local races because they are already out of contention of getting a punch.  It leads to discouragement.  I see this kind of behavior at our local track all the time.

      This sport is already small and niche enough, any kind of rule that makes you qualify to go to the next race only hinders the growth.  No matter what you will still see the same fast guys at the front whether there are 80 in the filed or 30 in the field.  It’s just more exciting with 80.   :)

    • #18151
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Wade,

      As everyone mentioned above having support when you are new to karting is the most important factor.  Driving technique will be your biggest learning curve for a while.  As you get better and better at driving your chassis setup will start becoming more and more important.  The good news is it really shouldn’t matter what chassis you are on because karters are unique in that they are very eager to help new people into the sport.  Since the same general principals in setup apply to all chassis it shouldn’t matter which one you are on.  Making friends with the most knowledgeable and helpful people at your track is what you need to focus on.  Of course being able to get parts locally or at least quickly from a dealer is also very important.  You will inevitably end up bending/breaking parts as you learn so quick access to these parts on a race weekend will be important unless you buy up spares of the most frequently damaged parts (axles, bumpers, steering shafts, spindles, etc).  I’m 6’4″ so we are in similar boats when it comes to chassis setups.  I have been racing 10 years  and I have good news for you.  Even though you are taller than most you can still be fast!  You will just have to work on your setup a little harder.   As for my personal chassis preference I must say that DR Kart is the best kart I have driven that works for my height.  It responds very well to setup changes unlike many other brands that I have raced.   The good news is CRG parts are interchangeable so if you are anywhere that doesn’t have DR parts but sells CRG parts you are good to go.   The other good news?  The price tag is cheaper than CRG karts as well.  All around the best kart/deal out there.  The DR team and myself are always available to help out with any help you might need.  Even if you aren’t on a DR Kart.  Good luck!

    • #18147
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      I am 6’4″ 200lbs and race S4 in the SKUSA ProTour.   About 3 years ago I got to the point where it hurt too much to drive because my upper body was not being properly supported.  My back was hurting and it took too much effort to keep myself upright in the corners.  Standard seats are just too short for taller drivers.   My father and I first attempted to do our own molding for a custom fit seat.  We were running short on time so we did some research and came across the Ribtect brand.  After talking to the owner Robby Mott about what seat would work best for me based on my dimensions I switched to the Ribtect XLT.  The T in XL is the version for taller drivers.   I have never been more comfortable driving a kart as I am now.  It fits me perfectly and works very well with the chassis.  The only modification I did was to trim down the front rib protectors that come across the front of your ribs.  It was more than I needed.  If you would like pictures feel free to PM me.  I hope this helps!

    • #10169
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Yes, sorry.  They are all 50×1040.  Send me your shipping address in PM for a shipping quote.

    • #38702
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      I highly recommend. They have been making sticker kits for me for the past 3 years. Mary is very helpful.

    • #24799
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      Oliver, you are correct about Jordon.

      Jimmy explained it well above.

    • #18213
      Chris Jennings
      Participant

      You should never should nor should you ever have to cut and reweld the seat stays for a bigger seat.  All you have to do is take a rubber mallet to the left one (opposite of motor side) and hammer it wider and wider until the seat fits.  Never widen the seat stay on the motor side.

      As for front porch I ran one for 9 years, and this year I chose not to run one for the first time.  It took some custom bending of the shifter and moving of the clutch lever but I made it fit.  I actually prefer not running the extended front porch and I’m 6’4″

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