Home Forums Briggs & Stratton 4-Cycle Racing Briggs LO206 What is the general feeling of the Briggs L0206?

This topic contains 15 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Paul Hir 4 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #32685

    Kevin Stevenson
    Participant

    Hello everyone I am planning on buying the Briggs L0206 engine for next years racing season. I would like to know what everyone’s feelings towards this engine is? As well as what are some of the pro’s and con’s of this engine. Please and thank you.

     

    Skullracer89

  • #32689

    Anonymous

    You will not regret it. I love both of mine. It is by far the cheapest, most reliable, most even playing field engine around right now. Classes are slowly growing here in the Midwest. Get in now and enjoy the heck out of it.

    -Derek

  • #32835

    Rob Kozakowski
    Participant

    Kevin! Go to 4cycle.com and check out their forums – Briggs OHV section and ask the question. You’ll get more feedback over there!

    You already know how I feel about it.

    In John Hughes’ words, Kevin D and I had the race of the weekend (even if he beat me) – and we’ve been battling each other wheel to wheel like that all season – without any engine failures, without fiddling with the engines, and without spending any money other than adding gas and changing oil.

    Ask Noel D about it too – he had more fun than his Rotax, which is exactly how I feel about it.

  • #32843

    Mike Bray
    Participant

    We started out with clones and soon discovered they are expensive, unreliable, high maintenance, and ultimately just complete crap.  144 times worse than regular crap.  On top of this when you have a read through the AKRA rulebook it takes about 50ms to realize it’s a class completely out of control.

    At our track there has been a movement away from clones and to LO206.  A few months ago the numbers were about equal.  And when you walked down the pit runner you could instantly tell who was running each motor just by the activity.  The clone guys were working their tails off between races with all sorts of maintenance duties.  The Briggs guys were usually kicked back in a chair enjoying a cold drink.  There’s an early adopter at our track that’s been running the same motor for almost 5 years.  All he’s ever done to it is change the oil and spark plug.

    If you just want to add some cheap gas and go race the 206 is the motor for you.  And it’s a class that is really starting to catch on.  NOLA has added a 206 class and from what I hear it’s getting big.  And DKC recently added a 206 class and they’ve had lots of interest too.

    • #32856

      Mike Morrone
      Participant

      Mike Bray,

      What tire is your track running for LO206? I’ve been reading the rule set for a few different tracks and I see MG IR (Blue), Bridgestone YDS, and Hoosier R60. Does a harder tire make racing more challenging/fun with a low power engine like this?

  • #32858

    Mike Bray
    Participant

    We are an MG sponsored track so everyone runs MG yellows.

  • #32860

    Jon Romenesko
    Participant

    I honestly have nothing bad to say about it.  Our local track just adopted the class this year, so we are all pretty new to the formula, but that’s the general feeling throughout the paddock.  Our (combined) field of LO206 is consistently probably 10 entries higher than the (combined) Rotax class at every race, and the racing is much better!

     

    We run on Duro tires, which are a pretty hard compound (they’re a rental tire, I believe) but have proven to be a pretty good match for the low HP briggs, incredibly durable (6 races on mine, several practices, and probably only hallway down the wear indicators), and very inexpensive (under $150 a set).  That’s the real key to keeping the class affordable, IMO.  The Duro tires will easily last all season, and there’s no advantage to strapping on new tires.  They may not offer the grip and speed of other tires, but that’s not what this class is about!

     

    So far, I’m willing to say its probably the best racing engine i’ve owned.  Rotax and Stock Honda are quite obviously faster, but monumentally more expensive to run, tricky to tune, etc.  With the Briggs, its just oil, gas, and race.  The rest is figuring out the chassis and driving, which is how karting should be at the club level.

     

    My Stock Honda has sat unused all year…and is probably going up for sale soon.

    GP10/CR125
    S2 Semi-Pro Stock Moto - SKUSA Rocky Mountain ProKart Challenge

    http://theslipangle.com/

  • #32868

    Mike Morrone
    Participant

    Jon,

     

    Do you have a link for the Duro tires?

  • #32898

    Clark Gaynor Sr.
    Participant

    Joe, our local sprint track is just starting a 206 class, but it’s been a bit slow getting folks interested.  It’s also a very small track with only about 50 or so entries per week for ALL classes.  And right now there are only two 206’s.

    As a note, my son and I come from a road race Stock Honda and Leopard background (and still do), and by comparison, the LO206 is SOOOO incredibly SIMPLE!!!!  And inexpensive!  I mean, why everyone doesn’t have one is beyond me.

    My question is, for those with successful 206 programs, what tends to be the most popular chassis type?  The one other competitor runs a typical narrow American made chassis with the semi reclining seat.  Where we run an old 07′ Intrepid Explorer Pro shifter chassis (had one sitting around)!  It’s 32 mm, so it’s WAY too much chassis for 9 HP, considering it was made for 40!!!

    Anyway, what chassis’ do you folks find to be popular for your sprint programs?

    Have a good day folks,

    Clark Sr.

  • #32994

    Cole Liggett
    Participant
  • #33071

    Bill Snow
    Participant

    We started running the LO206 this season at Pitt Race.  The past several seasons we ran Clones.  LO206 seems to be gas and go.  Little maintenance.

    The four cycle class at Pitt Race has been light this year so it’s difficult to gauge the competition.

    We are looking for more tracks in the Ohio area with LO206 programs…if you know of any good LO206 programs, let me know.

  • #33080

    Paul Hir
    Participant

    I run at the same track as Bill, 206 is a new program, I think with the right marketing, and support can gain traction. Clone was the predecessor and had a lot of support, but all the rule changes and unreliability seemed to bog the series down, which in turn killed it. So far I have been happy with my 206, my only complaint is the weight class, weighing in at 406lbs with kart and the heavy class is 360lbs, there is no way for me to be competitive. I know that my Chassis is part of the problem as the Aussie 4cycle karts tend to be heavy and more geared towards rentals. Otherwise I would highly recommend, in addition I have another kart and 206 combo for sale 

  • #33081

    David Cole
    Keymaster

    Paul, I weigh in at 190lbs without my racing gear. I had to add weight to my kart his weekend to make the 350lbs. for Briggs Medium. Rob Howden’s Margay had to weigh over 200lbs. to make the 390lbs. minimum for Masters.

    Are you running full bodywork, or CIK style? Is your kart really old?

    David Cole - EKN Managing Editor

  • #33082

    Paul Hir
    Participant

    David,

    I run a newer Arrow Warrior,CIK bodywork, Beasely Laydown Fiberglass seat, I weigh 230lbs, and that is as slim as I can get. I actually have a older Birel that weighs significantly less and I can get down to 375lbs with that kart. Is Gas heavy? perhaps I can run less gas.

  • #33085

    David Cole
    Keymaster

    At your weight, I would run the lightest kart you have. I ran a 2010 Birel at Rock Island, and it is light weight for sure.

    I ran extra gas for the purpose of weight. If you can, look for a smaller gas tank or just do not fill it up as high as you are. Every little bit helps.

    I think the Arrow Warrior is built stronger, so thus why it is probably heavier.

    David Cole - EKN Managing Editor

  • #33087

    Paul Hir
    Participant

    At your weight, I would run the lightest kart you have. I ran a 2010 Birel at Rock Island, and it is light weight for sure.

    I ran extra gas for the purpose of weight. If you can, look for a smaller gas tank or just do not fill it up as high as you are. Every little bit helps.

    I think the Arrow Warrior is built stronger, so thus why it is probably heavier.

    Well I would hate sell the arrows kart because it is brand new, but regardless I have 3 karts and I need to sell two.

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