Home Forums Shifter Karts Rules for open class shifters?

This topic contains 10 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Frank Rapisarda 4 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #38959

    brian heaton
    Participant

    I have looked everywhere on rules for open class shifter karts. Various racing orgs. Rule books. Came up with zip.

    Does anyone have a good source where I can learn what I can and can’t do to my motor?

    ThanksThanks

  • #39114

    Curtis Cooksey
    Participant

    First rule to open class shifter karts: there are no rules in open class shifter karts!

  • #39126

    Brad Johnson
    Participant

    G1 in the SKUSA book is open I believe.

  • #39131

    brian heaton
    Participant

    So if the theory of open class is “there are no rules in open class”

    Nitrous, superchargers, and turbos are o.k.? Nah don’t think so.

    I just looked over the SKUSA rulebook and there is no open class.

    As for the G1 Class it just mentioned 125cc stock moto/icc.

    I’m going out on a limb here, but open class isn’t very popular is it?

  • #39138

    Clark Gaynor Sr.
    Participant

    There really is no true open shifter class.

    There are ICC’s (also referred to as KZ’s as I recall) which are purpose built kart engines from Italy, from a variety of manufacturers, which also run to controlled specs, on race gas.  There are also modified moto’s like the Honda CR125.  Modifications could include open porting, ignition, carb, pipe, etc, also on race gas.  These two engine types typically run together as one class.

    I’m not that familiar with SKUSA rules, but you could look at the WKA Tech Manual, in the Sprint Road Race section, under CIK or WKA 125 Shifter.  That will give you an idea.

    Generally open/KZ shifters are not that popular in the US.  However the Northeast Shifter Kart Series gets a good number of them, but I believe they are mainly ICC’s.

    Maybe one of the NESKS guys could chime in hear with more details.

    Hope that helps.

    Clark Sr.

  • #39151

    Jeff Grivers
    Participant

    I am also getting into shifters and I plan on running the NESKS and would love to hear more on what is legal and what is not.  It is my understanding that NESKS has the stock Honda (which the ignition/electronics, porting, carburetor, combustion chamber all have to be stock and use a 99 or 01 cylinder).  I don’t think they run a modified Honda class.  They run the ICC and moto engine shifter karts at the same time but score them separately.  I am not 100% on all this and would love to hear more on the topic.

  • #39153

    Clark Gaynor Sr.
    Participant

    http://www.neshifterkartseries.com/

    There you go, get in touch.  Good group of guys.

    They share our WKC road race event at Summit Point, ,WV, Shenandoah circuit each year.  That’s on May 2-3, 2015.

    Hope the info helps,

    Clark Sr.

     

  • #39155

    Charles Skowron
    Participant

    In previous years of the NESKS, the Stock Motos and KZ/ICC shifters ran together, although scored separately.

    This season however, the two classes in the series were split and ran at different times, for the first time. I loved the sight, and once actually being in, a grid of 30-40+ 125 shifters ready to blast off at the green. But at a few races this year, there were simply too many in both classes to squeeze into one race. (A wonderful problem to have though when you think about it).

    Any Modified Moto karts, as opposed to Stock Moto, would have been put in the KZ class. But Mod Moto (Open Moto) karts in the series are a rare sight. The KZ class is usually completely KZ-powered.

    Having said that, Open Moto karts have run there before, and if you showed up with an Open Moto kart at an NESKS race, I doubt they would turn you away. How they would score you, I don’t know. They might class your kart completely separate from the other classes, but they’d place you somewhere. Like Clark said above, the people who run the show are a good group of people.

     

     

     

     

  • #39178

    Brad Johnson
    Participant

    G1 allows for porting, open CCV, polishing of trans parts, open pipe. Its about as open as it will be.

  • #39195

    Ben Matthew
    Participant

    NHKA at Loudon runs an “open” shifter class due to limited numbers.  Meaning that stock moto has to run against the KZ guys.  Not a problem if your Josh Lane, but for the rest of the humans on Stock Moto its a drubbing.  With that said the Hill Course at Loudon is one of the most unique and challenging tracks in the northeast for any driver.  The racing at the front between the KZs as well as at the back with the Motos is always excellent and in the end nobody cares too much about trophies and points as long as the racing is good.

    In regards to the NESKS:  For our last race of the season we went to NJ with our 15 year old chassis/motor package to see what the competition was like.  My driver qualified 19th out of 21 after having won his local club championship.  These guys and gals at NESKS in both the KZs and the stock moto are extremely fast and professional and take their racing very seriously.

    If this is your first year in a shifter kart you do not belong running with NESKS.  Although they welcome everyone to run with them which is nice, its not realistic.

    Do not bring your 15 year old chassis and home prepped engine thinking that you might run with NESKS, you will be in the way (like we were).

    NESKS is as close to SKUSA as we get in the northeast.  Drivers should have perfected their racecraft and have a well sorted mechanical package before trying to enter one of these races.

    Just my $.02

  • #39267

    Frank Rapisarda
    Participant

    Brian, I race the NESS and had a mod moto. 2 years ago mod moto and KZ ran together but for the most part mod moto’s are out. I ran a KZ for most of this past year till I blew it up, and then put the mod moto back on. This time they made me run it in the stock Honda class. The new rule for this year is only KZ’s in the KZ class and all other will run in the Honda class, but not sure how they would score you. I am sure if you do well with a mod moto in a stock class someone will be complaining about  it. I hate running stock stuff but I had to do it, you can go just about club race or national series and run it.

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