Home Forums General Karting Discussion Buying chassis

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    • #77388
      William Weiler
      Participant

      Is there a way to try different manufacturers chassis to see which one I like? I went to Sonoma yesterday and rented a LO206 Kart. The office person said maybe driving instructors will have a particular Kart when doing instruction. She also said maybe Cameron, Infinity or Simraceway will do a specific rental or try before I buy. Is this actually done? Seems like a problem for new drivers because their isn’t a way to try different Karts before buying. She said she personally found all the chassis different.

      TonyKart 401s LO206
      Masters Class
      Morgan Hill, CA

    • #77392
      FREDDY SANDOVAL
      Participant

      Dude! Just buy any Fairly new LO206 kart and you’ll be happy with it, drive it for a season and re sell it if you want something better. You’ll be just fine. Just head out to the track and do a bunch of seat time, and practice, That’s all you really need for now, just to get your foot in the door. We all rotate to better quality karts/chassis gradually and eventually.

      Just do it, you’ll love it, but just go out there and get it done!

       

    • #77403
      Aaron Hachmeister
      Participant

      If you’re new, chassis brand isn’t going to matter. The chassis is just what’s under you to get you around the track. The most important part of a kart is the squishy thing in the seat.

      My first chassis was an 8 year old Haase Monte Carlo. After a while, when we got an OTK 7 years newer, I’m not even sure we ran half a second quicker. Don’t worry about chassis, just make sure it’s supported by a shop in the area. You can throw a 206 on anything right now, just grab that and go.

    • #77415
      Walt Gifford
      Participant

      Just make sure anything you buy you can get brake rebuild kit for it.

      Gif

      FAA certified jet engine and aircraft technician,
      Nicholson Speedway class champion 2001,
      Yamaha KT100 Service Center,
      41 years karting experience

    • #77434
      Rob Kozakowski
      Participant

      At this point, you’ll probably “like” the one with the most comfortable seat…

      As the others said, find a chassis that is supported by a local shop and learn to drive it.  Then learn to tune it a bit.

      Once you’ve made it that far, then worry about which chassis you want as your next kart.

    • #77439
      Mike Clark
      Participant

      I will echo the others:

      As a new driver you won’t be able to tell much and probably wouldn’t know why you felt what you did. A bigger decision is whether to buy new or used. If you can get some support then new from the local kart shop may be the biggest factor. I wouldn’t expect too much support from an individual on a used kart.

      A cheap way to get some hands on is to help others at races and test/practice sessions. Just work it out ahead of time. That will help you decide on some things like what kart stand to by. I can tell you being solo in the pits has it’s challenges.

      Renting a kart may be an option. It can be a bit overwhelming at first. The LO206 is a nice staring point. Do not mistake that for being easy. Some aspects of it are easier, but it just make the other stuff more critical.

      Yesterday a new guy showed up looking to get into karting. He told me this is the first thing he is ever doing that and not jumping in head first. Sounds like a smart approach

      By all means keep asking questions. I you can avoid any pitfalls it does help enjoy the sport better. I am pretty new to karting myself.

    • #77614
      Troy Berry
      Participant

      One thing to keep in mind is the Chassis type. Without a doubt, at the big races the karts running up front are on a chassis that is designed to work with the Motor type. This is especially becoming the case in 4 cycle, now that some of the manufactures have taken notice of the LO206 revolution and started developing chassis specifically for the 4 cycle motor. You see the difference in the way they make the chassis for an inboard drive, generally 28mm tubing, 40mm axles, and lighter components overall. If you goal is to race a 206, then a 4 cycle specific chassis like the BirelArt am29, the new VLR from RLV, the Praga Dark, or the Tony Kart STVK will work best overall. If your serious and want to keep at it, spend more than you want and buy newer. Overall you will be happier than chasing the problems of a used kart that wasn’t made for 4 cycles anyway!

      "The Art is in the details"
      BirelArt AM29 LO206
      Intrepid Cruiser KA 100

    • #77868
      William Weiler
      Participant

      I’m taking everyone’s advice and going LO206. I live in Morgan Hill and see I can most easily race at Marina or Sonoma. Marina is big on LO206 but I don’t know about Sonora, Sanzuru didn’t list lo206 as one of their classes. So far I am looking at local vendors like suggested. Cambrian is the closest then fastech, then Sonoma (Infinity,Cameron and Simraceway). I don’t feel connected to the Margay’s at Somona, probably because they’re pretty beat up. I like the way the CRG’s look, but that is kind of all I know about them.

      TonyKart 401s LO206
      Masters Class
      Morgan Hill, CA

      • #77874
        Aaron Hachmeister
        Participant

        If you live closest to Cambrian, go with the BirelART, or one of their used Birels. That’ll be the closest to you so parts are available and they are (appearing to be) a good shop.

        Troy, I wouldn’t be too concerned about the chassis too much in terms of built application quite yet. I’ve seen plenty of guys just throw a 206 on a “2 stroke” chassis and run just as well as everyone else. For the time being, we’re just trying to help this man find a brand in his area that’ll get him on the track

    • #77895
      Mark Traylor
      Participant

      aaron is right. The Don and Donald show at cambrian is quite good. The birel product is really great. You can also race 206 at the tracks around sacramento also.

    • #78054
      William Weiler
      Participant

      Went to Sonoma today for a rental. The LO206 Margay I had actually felt pretty good. Weight transfer seemed easy and predictable, unlike last time (?). I still have trouble with digressive braking. I have trouble getting to maximum brake quickly and not going under or over. Probably because I have been progressive braking my whole life.

      TonyKart 401s LO206
      Masters Class
      Morgan Hill, CA

    • #78241
      William Weiler
      Participant

      I will call Cambrian tomorrow and see about a AM29-Y/LO206 package. I am also thinking of a Margay Brava at Fastech Racing. I think maybe the Brava is the same as the Ignite but better brakes. A complete Ignite with the LO206 is $4k, wow, not bad. I bet this really brings people into karting.

      TonyKart 401s LO206
      Masters Class
      Morgan Hill, CA

    • #78248
      David Cole
      Keymaster

      Here are the differences. Not much. I believe the brakes are the same, with the exception of the rotor.

      http://www.margay.com/karts/models/brava-415.html

      http://www.margay.com/karts/models/ignite-k3.html

      David Cole - EKN Managing Editor

    • #78275
      Greg Dingess
      Participant

      The Brava 4.15 uses the billet system and the Ignite K3 uses the Cast system.  The 4.15 has a little more stopping power, but both systems are more than enough for LO206 racing.

      I’d recommend the Ignite K3 from Fastech.  The baseline set-up window is very wide, which eliminates the need to make adjustments right out of the gate.  This will allow you to focus on driving, your hands, feet, etc.  The important stuff! :)

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