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Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 39 total)
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  • #53004

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Chris H is right. The kart can pull even with correct toe setting.  Set steering straight ahead, square front to rear, then set toe.  Obviously, you’ll need to do any repairs to bent bits before all of that.

    BTW: zero toe on the stand isn’t zero toe on the ground with you sitting in it.  Most karts toe-in considerably when placed on the tarmac.  I usually go for 2 – 4 mm toe out on the stand, but every kart is different.

    #52889

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Sounds like you’ve done everything correct so far.  I would consider putting the spindle back to matching the other side and tweak the chassis again to get matching side to side in front.  That will at least give you a consistent starting point with ride height in front.

    When your weights arrive, try getting your %’s after resting some weights in various locations.  You might get really close with that much poundage.

    BTW: I’ve had a couple of chassis that like 59% rear, but those were shifters (different requirements for rear grip).

    #52876

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Hey Richard,

    A couple of questions and tossing out some ideas for things to try…

    1.  You mentioned it’s a new chassis so why is the right spindle dropped one spacer?  Was this to compensate for the cross weight or something else?

    2. What do you mean by seat positioning is maxed out?  All the way back or butted-up against something? (I’m guessing this is a tall driver and you don’t want to move seat forward.)

    I’m not familiar with the setup on an Lo206 chassis, but the numbers you are shooting for are pretty standard for most karts.  It might require mounting weight at the front of the kart to achieve those % (based on where you are now).  Try scaling again, and rest the weights on the front center of the seat and your legs (just over the front seat tabs).  This should give you an idea if it’s possible to get enough weight forward without actually mounting the weights.  My guess is you’ll either have to mount a weight up near the steering shaft (not recommended) or move the seat forward a bit.

     

    As for the cross weight:  That can be caused by minor movements in the steering when scaling as well as one tire slightly larger than other side.  Did you make sure steering geometry is set correctly (toe, camber, caster) and then scale several times to make sure you get consistent readings.  Also measure your tires to make sure they aren’t the cause of the cross-weight.

    The right spindle thing is kinda weird, but you can easily fix a tweaked chassis (if that’s the reason for it), but jacking it up on one side and jumping on the other (lightly).  It’s done all the time, but don’t worry about that until you let us know why the spindle was dropped.

     

    #52840

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    I found Nick Firestone’s rain setup guide but it requires a subscription to his newsletter.  His newsletter is definitely worth it, so if interested buy it or try the free trial issue:

    http://firestonekartinfo.com/?cat=11

     

     

    #52839

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Odd that they would go wider in the rear for rain setup.  All rain setups that I’ve used involve going wider in front (a lot wider) and then setting rear approx same or slightly skinnier than the front.  Rear rain rims/tires are also not as wide to begin with, so that makes the rear narrower by default.

    In the rain the kart wants to push really hard on turn entry, so the goal is to get the kart to tip easier by using a wide front (lots of mechanical jacking effect) and skinny rear.

    I’ll see if I can dig up a good rain setup guide.

     

     

    #52692

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Hey, there’s no right or wrong…. if you like to innovate and are having fun, that’s what counts.

    #52683

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Ace, on a more serious note… if the padding is very thick (and comfy) you may find it changes the handling.  In essence, you’ll be sitting higher and slightly more forward.  It’s a common rain-racing trick to add towels to the bottom of the seat to raise the center of gravity; your recliner may achieve a similar outcome.  Test it and see…

    Just curious: if you’re existing seat was already too skinny, how are you going to fit in there with the added padding?

    #52657

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Nice recliner, but where’s the thingy to hold the beer and remotes?

    #52581

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Assuming nothing is bent (including steering components), and your front is is properly aligned then it’s probably weight distribution side to side.  Have you scaled it yet?  If not, start there and you’ll have a good idea of what to change.

    If you don’t have access to good scale setup, then just invest in a set of cheap bathroom scales.  They work fine as long as you are careful and can repeat the scaling the same way each time. (well, that goes for a good scale setup too).

    BTW: I remember reading somewhere you can scale with just one or 2 scales.  Maybe someone can chime in on that procedure….

    #52094

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Alan, thanks for the pics. It looks like your conversion was done by someone different than mine or perhaps because it’s a different carb (I misspoke earlier; my carb is a PWM not ‘K’, so that might explain the differences)

    Your evac is closer to front of carb and as you said it’s might be lower in the bowl. It also appears to be straight (mine curves into the bowl).

    Hmmm…  I think I’ll have to runs some more testing and see if I can narrow it down jetting wise.  It may have been way too fat on the bottom last time out; it felt like I was short-shifting everywhere but shift points were normal rpm wise (and over-rev was fine).  I might try Fastech to see if they have access to the conversion specs.

     

     

    #51968

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Hi Todd,

    Wow they up to 4 rings now on the manifolds?  I have 3 after-market manifolds; two with 2 rings and another with 3 and I think the 2 worked better.  They both seemed to last for about 3 to 4 track days with the viton o-rings.

    The biggest problem I ran into with the o-rings was trying to get the pipe over them without cutting them.  I think that’s why the 2 rings worked best (easier to get the pipe over just 2 o-rings).  Not sure if that’s what you are experiencing. If so, try using just 2 rings closest to the motor and use plenty of lube when putting the pipe over them. Also, make sure your o-rings are the proper size.  I know there are at least 2 sizes out there.  If the rings are loose, they are too big and won’t seal very well.

    BTW: The after market manifolds/o-rings became such a pain in the buttox that I went back to the stock manifold with rtv silicone.  Much easier and it last a couple of track days.

     

     

    #51830

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Hi Todd,

    Thanks for the tip on the gearing.  I figured an 18/22 might be a good starting point.

    The injury thing must be going around.  I messed up at Streets of Willow and ended up in ER.  Hope you get better soon and we’ll go drafting again (is that beer or main straight?  can’t remember)

    #51733

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Noah,

    If it still has the floats, it’s a stock carb.   The floats are removed as part of the pump-around modification and the evac tube is added.  Thanks for the offer on the pics, but your carb doesn’t have that tube.

    #45846

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Where is it causing interference?  Example: it’s hitting motor on right near front right or it’s too tall and crunching my armpit. Nah, forget that… call Ribtect, explain the situation and get the right answer.  877-RIBTECT

    #44979

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Check with Fasttech.  I’m not sure if they still handle the modification, but it’s worth asking them.  It says it includes pumps, so not sure if you could work a deal:

    http://www.fastech-racing.com/pump-around-modification.html

    #44659

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Hard to tell too much about the jetting from here and there are so many things that can affect it.  First, how do you know it’s rich?  Did you read the plug or piston top?  It could actually be lean if it’s causing a hard ‘bog’ out of the corner.

    The outside temp does affect the air but, it can be so different from day to day (or hour to hour).  A weather gauge is your best friend when trying to set jetting based on air changes.  Anyway, if you’re used to running safe jetting and it usually works, don’t worry too much about that right now.

    Check your plug to verify jetting and work from there.  It could be your pilot, needle, main, pumps, floats etc.  Any could cause the problem, but since you mentioned new pump and floats, my guess is:

    Fuel pump isn’t working correctly which would mean it’s lean. (this could also be caused by a pinched fuel line or tank pickup problem)

    Floats aren’t set (or maybe stuck) and it’s could be lean or rich.

    What’s the fuel sitch?  Do you know it to be good fresh fuel?

     

    #41577

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Doug, that was an amazing 1st lap in the 3rd video!  I haven’t watched the end yet, but you are catching everyone like the dinner bell just rang (and you are a STARVING lunatic)

    Edit…

    Oops.  I guess that was one of the Mikes in the 3rd vid.  Don’t know the guy, but he was flying.

    #41527

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    The difference is probably in components.  The kart in your link appears to have aluminum wheels, standard pills instead of independent caster/camber in the front, inexpensive seat, and probably cheap aftermarket axle.  I’m just guessing at these items, but that’s usually where a vendor will make concessions to reduce the expense for an entry level kart.  Even if all of that is true, it’s still a nice deal at $3500 shipped.

    The Righetti Ridolfi components I’ve bought were all very nice.  They’ve been around for a long time, so support shouldn’t be a problem.

    Has anyone seen one of these in the States?

    #41523

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    It does appear to be a real shifter kart for KZ application.  I don’t know what you saw (ebay probably), so I can’t speak to that particular deal,   $3500 is a really good price for a new complete roller.  Anyway, the viper looks like it’s a gold kart made by RR (so yes, it’s Italian).

    Might be able to get more details here:

    http://www.goldkart.com/kart.php?id=119

    #41191

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Your’s is a single pump fuel system.  As Greg said, it should be fine.

    A pump-around system uses 2 pumps and a modified carb to work with 2 pumps. 1 pump is for feeding carb and the other to scavenge the excess and send it back to the tank.

    Here’s a pic:

    http://www.fastech-racing.com/pump-around-modification.html

    #40783

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    You may want to get a hold of Nick at http://firestonekartinfo.com

    He’s done quite a bit of data analysis and can probably help you out.  Check out these articles he did on the topic:

    http://firestonekartinfo.com/?cat=183

     

    #40782

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    A common problem… mushy brakes that is.  When you replaced the seals, did you do the caliper as well as the master cyl?

    You may have a very tiny leak near a fitting on the brake lines.  Those are tough to find, and it doesn’t take very much air getting sucked-in to cause mushy/fading brakes.

    #39909

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Diego,

    Need some more details.  Are you checking the clutch with the engine running and warm or is it just sitting cold?

    Was the clutch properly disengaging before you stored the kart 4 months ago?  If so, the cable is probably is set correctly, but it’s easy to check it. Pull the clutch lever and look at the inside of the motor (near seat) to see if it’s moving the clutch engagement lever.

    The clutch will always have some bite even when completely disengaged and it’s even more bite when cold (the clutch fluid is very thick when cold).  Also, the clutch plates will occasionally stick together when they’ve been sitting still for a long time.  You can usually just put it in gear, pull in the clutch and rock the kart back and forth until they break free.  It will probably help to start the motor and warm it up for a few minutes.

    Hope that helps, but let me know if not and we’ll try a few more things.

     

     

    #39746

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    Yep, in fact you can even negotiate on groceries.  I’ve never done it, but I’ve witnessed it a few times at checkout.

    Keep in mind most kart shops are dealing with small margins to begin with, so you’re wiggle room may be less than buying an expensive TV or car.

    #39431

    Randy McKee
    Participant

    P.S.

    One more type of bog, but probably not the case.  Many drivers tend to use too much of the lower power band and the motor bogs when it’s too low in the rpm range.  In other words, it’s not ‘on-the-pipe’ when they get on the power.  Anyway, if you think you’re too low on the rpm’s, try a lower gearing (or shift down one more) to keep it rev’d up.

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 39 total)