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Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 74 total)
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  • #40113

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Maybe too late since you have the Haas frame, but I were building a backyard dirt oval I’d look into 1/4 midgets.

    #39988

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Devil’s advocate, ok: By running SKUSA class and rules, they’ve just doubled the number of national-level shifter events in the US.  Plus they’ve made use of what is already the biggest kart race in the US to expand and give karters more bang for the buck in Vegas.  I’m sure most national teams appreciate being able to pack-up and go to Vegas and now have two world-class events plus an expo in one trip.

    I understand the immediate concern. MAXSpeed is Rotax in the US and this is the first time they’ve expanded beyond Rotax Max classes at an event.  But If I were running the SKUSA Pro Tour, I’d be pretty excited by this news for expanding my season and investment while at the same time still supporting SKUSA and their full season.

    Also, it does seem funny that we have one thread complaining about manufacturers and promoters doing their own thing when it comes to rules packages (State of Karting in USA), followed by foul calls in this thread when someone adopts the same rules towards two separate organisations. I hope that irony isn’t lost on others. ;-)

    Lastly, (and this is kinda completely off-topic), I’ve never understood why any organisation hasn’t carved up the US into regions and divisions.  Then allow things to take root locally –  regionally – and finally holding division championships funneling up into a single National championship race.  Seems MAXSpeed has the ability to do this.  But instead has what is essentially four or five random and disconnected racing series running over the course of a season.  Note I’m not criticizing the current MAXSpeed commitment, just recognizing that no one has managed to bring the county together under one banner/championship in a most efficient way.

    #39836

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Matt, keep in mind you should let the stop watch be the final indicator as to gearing.  But a Rotax senior should easily rev to over 13,000 rpm.  A well sorted senior should be capable of revving to close to 14,000.  Although that might not be necessary depending on the track.

    #39835

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    CRG 2000-up rear calipers are the same as VEN05 front brake calipers.  So they do share the same pad design.  But be aware that the VEN05 rear calipers (and thus pads) are very different from the 2000-up.

    I have two CRG karts with 2000-up rear braking systems and I prefer the Ferodo Kart Attack pads – for feel, longevity and price.  FWIW.

    Replacement is really simple.  Remove the pad retaining clip and bolt, and pull the old pads out.  Press the pistons all the way back inside the caliper, and insert the new pads. I find removing the master cylinder cover(s) helps the pistons to retract easier.  As long as nothing leaks and the system is working well you’ll be fine.  I’d inspect the brake fluid at the time and flush the system if its dirty, or top it off if its low (after replacing the pads so that the pistons are reset).

    Remember t0 replace the master cylinder covers before you pressurize the system with the pedal.  If you leave the covers off, the fluid will shoot out of the top.

    #39533

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    And the test data begins.  This is encouraging.  Good post Larry.  Thanks.

    #39532

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Typically, CHT is only used on an air-cooled engine (such as a Yamaha KT-100 or Briggs LO206).  If the engine is water-cooled, you want to monitor water temperature.

    As for tuning, a temp probe in the exhaust header measuring exhaust gas temps is preferred.

    #39316

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    I posted in that thread.  But when the thread stopped, I thought I’d start one in the proper Rotax forum to gauge what other Rotax drivers were thinking as this moves forward.

    Like you mentioned, I too am surprised by the lack of posts.  A lot of the 2015 rules packages and schedules are starting to appear and looks as if many are side-stepping the new Evo engines to see how things turn out – which doesn’t bode well for Rotax in 2015 IMO.  My local track is getting behind the X-30 after being a big Rotax supporter (which isn’t surprising considering they’re spear-heading the IAME-East distribution).  Its just bad timing all around as far as Rotax is concerned and I guess that’s going to factor into where I eventually land.

    I wish I’d see more support from the karters, but honestly the lack of it is a bit disconcerting.  Seems the market is speaking – so to speak – and the ball is squarely in Rotax’s court to make this work. Like I said, I’ll be upgrading my motors.  But beyond that, I’m beginning to wonder if at the upgrade price points they’ve release, its still not enough to maintain market share in a what turns out to be pivotal year for brands and alliances.  Time will tell, but If I were Rotax (and MaxSpeed here in the States), I’d be watching, listening, and responding quickly over the next few months.

    I’d still like to hear other’s thoughts on this.

    #39111

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Maybe by 2016 there can be a class for unsealed engines with starters.  Someplace where older Rotax and Leopards can race.  We can call it TaG. ;-)

    #38227

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    I view the EVO to past 125 MAX motors more like the X30 to the Leopard.  Its meant as a replacement and they took the opportunity to make wholesale improvements.

    #38161

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    I’ve been expecting something like this ever since that Rotax survey was circulating last year.  And honestly, I think everything looks pretty good.  With IAME coming on strong and introducing the X30, it was clear Rotax was going to re-engineer the 125 MAX platform.  Its proven to be a good platform for the past 15 years.  But it was time to make some changes to address consistency and drive-ability issues people had with it.  And it looks like that exactly what they’ve addressed.

    It would be nice to see some incentives to help existing owners upgrade, but it appears the inventory’s not there to do that just yet.  But it wouldn’t surprise me to see something in the future.

    The piston is “no-brainer” –  and will happen for all future rebuilds regardless.

    The carb to me is a must have, as it has always been the source of the jetting issues.

    The electronic power valve is a nice feature, but is not that critical as to need it anytime soon on an existing engine (so long as you’re the type that maintains your RAVE valve on a regular basis).  So that removes it, and the new ignition coil and box, from the must-have upgrades list.

    Same for the exhaust.

    All that’s left is the crank and con-rod.  That might bite a bit in the rebuild charge, but that’s the biggest chunck of change IMO (and probably a significant portion of the power gains).

    Still, the Rotax market is going to be a bit crazy for the next year.  The bottom’s going to fall out for alot of spare parts.

    #37669

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Maybe: http://strosin-larkin-and-sipes4012.myshopify.com/products/kart-chassis-setup-theory-and-practical-guide

    Looks like a good read.

    #37214

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    New update: http://www.racer.com/imsa/item/110949-memo-gidley-update-two-more-surgeries-all-going-in-the-right-direction-throttle-down

    Also the Robin Miller interview from the Indycar race at Sonoma.  So good to hear of his continued progress.

    #37180

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    The only difference is the RAVE power valve. But to add that you need a Senior cylinder block. New, the items run about $900 in parts. Now you can find these used. RAVE assemblies run between $75 and $150. Cylinder blocks anywhere from $150 to $400. I’ve recently heard that Rotax has relaxed the cylinder block casting serial number rules, so you should be able to use any year.

    Now add to this labor and resealing costs. Thats going to run you another hundred or two. At this point you might consider a top-end rebuild just to match a new cylinder to the new block I.D. That will probably only cost you a hundred more.

    #36862

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    I set one of my karts up for a friend. We fit a Tillett T10 XXL seat and so we needed to expand the struts a good bit.  I did fit an old axle over the right side strut and bend it outward a bit.  Mind you, on this CRG frame it was a bit difficult to move it as to the way the strut is fitted to the frame.  But we did end up getting just under an inch of rightward expansion.  We scaled the kart and still had more weight left than right, so it was the right thing to do. With a driver of his size you’re already over weight minimums, so no chance to add weight and re-balance without that weight penalizing you’re laptime.

    Best of luck.

    #35532

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    I’d be on the fence about the frame.  The price point is good considering its a 2013 kart, but that frame has been raced hard to get that amount of flat-spotting in a single season.  If it were me, that amount of flat spotting would bother me.  But again, a 2013 Tony Kart is going carry some value regardless.  In the end its up to you, But I think you can find an older kart in much better shape for the same – if not less money.  $2500 to $3000 can buy a nice used kart if you’re patient and look hard enough.

    I’d also listen to guys about buying a kart serviced by your local track.  And also about buying one already set-up for the engine class you intend to run.

     

    #33563

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Absolutely!  Thanks Troy.

    #33561

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Some days I have waayyy to much time. LOL!

     

    #33463

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Great to know. Thanks!

    #33454

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Here’s some pictures to underline what I’m asking about.

    #33218

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    LO206 is a good option at GoPro Motorplex.  They’ve just started a Wednesday night series around the rental karts that features an LO206 racing karts class.  Spec Hoosier EL26 hard compound tires and a simple walk-up $40 registration fee.  Its about as inexpensive as kart racing can be.

    #32899

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    I use products called Rapid Prep and Rapid Tac.

    Rapid Prep removes the oils and grime on the surface.  Its works so will that I bought a large size and use it to clean the plastics regularly.  Preparation of the surface is the most important part to get the graphics to adhere.

    After the plastics are clean, spray the surface with Rapid Tac.  This will allow you to slide the graphic over the surface to line it up correctly.  After that use a small, soft squeegee and work from the center out to remove the application fluid and air bubbles.

    Once down, you can use a hair dryer to set the adhesive.  Also at this stage you can use heat to mold the graphic around any corners where it doesn’t sit well (most graphics will have a split in the vinyl to accomplish this over complex shapes).  Don’t use too much heat as you’ll stretch the graphic and then it will never lay flat over the surface.  Always work towards the split.

    #32484

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Some use an old axle (or any long steel pipe) that you can get some leverage going with.  Be sure to wrap it with some thick fabric like a towel to prevent scratching the frame.  A quick search on YouTube will give you result showing how its done.

    #32311

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Thanks Kirk.  Nice to hear the benefit.  Sliding the rear through the corners is exactly what I’m trying to resolve.

    #30078

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    I second David’s comment re: Briggs LO206 class.  Its affordable and the formula will allow her to focus more on racing rather than tuning.  Rotax would be fast enough that tuning the kart becomes a bigger part of the equation and that might make it less fun if she can’t be competitive.

    As for chassis: at GoPro Motorplex I’d go with Arrow as they can provide a lot of support for the chassis there. And the majority of garage owners there have Arrow karts so you can get more advice for set-ups and what not.

    #30042

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    So another thought is the starter bushing wire has started to come undone.  It might even be touching the starter cover (which *might* short out the electrical system and cause the kart to stop running on the track).  If you only have a thread or two of the braided wiring in the bushing connected I could see that causing the starter issue.  And the bushing wiring is a known item that wears over time.  If anyone at the track has a spare starter you could try swapping out and seeing what that does.

    If you race Rotax, a spare starter is a must for your spares kit.

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 74 total)