Home Forums Briggs & Stratton 4-Cycle Racing Briggs LO206 Using new tires, does it help more than it hurts?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Gary Lawson 3 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #47819

    Troy Berry
    Participant

    My 12 year old is running  Jr. 2 LO206 at our local sprint club. We use the Bridgestone YLC  on an Intrepid Crusier, stock slide at 320 lbs.  Our track is a medium grip track once it gets some rubber on it. So far the advise has been to run used tires. The fastest in the class is on used tires, so there seems to be no advantage to buying new tires. We are not far off the pace on used tires and my driver is still learning. He is pretty clean through the turns, and not sliding as much as he learns to let it roll off the corners.  I know in the higher horsepower classes like Tag that new tires are a must to get the grip you need.  At what point will new rubber help us with some  additional traction without being over stuck? Obviously we have to get us a new set and do some testing. I would like to hear some thoughts on when you would you mount new tires on a race day with a 4 cycle kart? Thanks!

    "The Art is in the details"
    BirelArt AM29 LO206
    Intrepid Cruiser KA 100

  • #47842

    Gary Lawson
    Participant

    As you seem to understand, running new vs used has a few determining factors. Higher hp classes will want new tires as much as possible. Slower classes require them less, especially if the track is grippy. The other main factors are the kart itself and the chassis setup. Some karts get tight easily whereas others want more grip. My sr 206 kart likes new tires usually but I’ve been to tracks where I’ve ran the same ylc’s for three days against all new tires and won. Best thing to do is test it yourself. Midsummer I would be less likely to put on new.

  • #47849

    Taylor Young
    Participant

    If your kart is set up properly you will almost always be faster on newer tires. If you are faster on used tires that means the kart is over stuck and the set up is wrong. Now if you were using very very soft tires on a low horsepower class sure used might be better. But we don’t run those types of tires in the US and certainly not at club level.

    If you’re new and still learning then used tires will be okay, you really have to be right on that razor’s edge to take advantage of new tires. If I were you I would record your set up right now on those used tires, seems like it works well for you. When you get new tires if you go slower, throw a softer axle in, shorter hubs, etc.

    If you’re able to beat others at the track with those used tires, stick to it, save some money. But if you want to get the most out of the kart, tune it for the tires and you’ll be even faster.

  • #48010

    Troy Berry
    Participant

    Thanks for the advise! That all seems to make sense. Tune the chassis to the tires as well as track conditions. I’ll bet as we hit our very hot and dry race days of summer here in the high desert  the new tires will make less of a difference. With the air temp at 70-80 and when the sun is out, he is having a hard time getting the tire pressure to raise much more than a pound per tire during a run. That is starting at 15- 16 lbs. A couple of the fast guys start a little higher around 18, but my driver starts sliding around a lot if I bump him up that much.  We are using Douglas LV Mag wheels which seem to be very consistent with their heat cycles.  What is the average or optimal heat gain that I should be getting during an average 12 lap session or race? I’m not sure he is getting the tires hot enough to get the rubber at the optimal grip level.

     

    "The Art is in the details"
    BirelArt AM29 LO206
    Intrepid Cruiser KA 100

  • #48085

    Chris Hatch
    Participant

    DO they prep your track with asphalt sealer (old school guys call it bear grease).  If so, used tires typically work better.

    In general, low HP tires will like new front tires but can get more time out of the rears.

  • #48156

    Troy Berry
    Participant

    Chris,

    Yes, our track has a top coating on it, which actually helped with the grip on our surface.  I was thinking about the fronts only option. I think I will have to try it. Seems like having max front grip would be a good thing, regardless of how the rears are gripping up.

    "The Art is in the details"
    BirelArt AM29 LO206
    Intrepid Cruiser KA 100

  • #48437

    Gary Lawson
    Participant

    Too much front grip can’t bind the kart for sure but not as badly as too much rear.

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