Home Forums Rotax Max Update / re-issue passport costs?

This topic contains 18 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Ted Hamilton 7 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #20424

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    So, I’m happy because my “new” Rotax Max showed up today. Seems in great condition, however….

    It has the old-style clutch, and the old style airbox. Not sure of carb venture sizing, and don’t know if the cylinder is one of the ones in spec or not… Has a black seal on it (intact), but no other seal, and has no passport.

    I’ll be taking it to my local rotax service center (GoPro Motorplex), but before I get major sticker shock there, what’s a rough good estimate on updating the clutch and airbox, resealing, and getting a new valid passport? I’ll assume the carb and cylinder are legal for the purposes of this question…

    TIA for any input…. ~Ted

    #20425

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    Also, any spares I should get, beyond a set of jets? :)

    #20431

    Daniel White
    Participant

    Clutch changeover is $500 or a bit more. Air box and correct bracket is around $70.

     

    #20445

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    $500 for a drum clutch?! Welcome to Rotax…

    #20446

    Jeff Salak
    Participant

    Ted,

    Sounds like you should of asked a bunch of these questions before you purchased this engine. IMO your cylinder will not be a 2009 or newer based on all the other changes needed.
    If your club racing chances are you wont need to make all these changes for club racing. If you plan on doing more than club racing you will need the updates. Check your local track rules on Rotax.
    By the time you do all this to this engine it will be close to 2K with parts and labor.
    A cylinder is close to $700, clutch kit $500, airbox around $70, new piston for new cylinder $150, plus all the gaskets, bearings and other parts needed to complete with seal and labor.
    I would sell engine and get a newer engine. What ever you decide to do, Rotax is still a better investment than the other Tag engines.

    #20498

    Rob Kozakowski
    Participant

    In Canada, I’m pretty sure we’re ok to run older cylinders.  We’re supposed to have the clutch/steel gear update, new airbox, and 8.5 carb – which many of the engines with older cylinders won’t have. 

    If you’re buying an older one, there’s also normally no telling how many hours it really has on it, so you’re almost obliged to have the seal broken and inspected, in which case, you’d may as well refresh the top end.

    Your best bet when buying a Rotax Max is definitely to get a completely updated engine – preferably with passport to see when it was last sealed (generally a reasonable indication of how many hours might be on the engine).  Otherwise, what seems like a “deal”, can turn expensive when you bring it up to current specs.

    There’s lots of “good” deals (and truly bad ones) on karts with out-of-spec Rotax engines up here in Canada where Rotax is about all we have for 2-cycle racing.  I’ve been looking to get some friends into Rotax, and the first questions I ask when shopping for them is whether the engines are updated.

    #20508

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    I knew what I was getting into, kinda. The complete, running engine was $900. So even with a fresh rebuild/seal/update at $1000 that’s still around what an updated one would cost and if I prefer, I can run it as-is for club or WKA. I don’t plan on RMax USA competition yet.

    I’ll be at the GoPro Motorplex meeting and we’ll see what they allow locally and not…worst case, I’ll race “for fun” and get DQ’d. I doubt they’ll check the engine before every race and they’ll probably be happy to see another entry fee.

    Worse case, it will be cheap practice engine.

    Thanks for the input.

    #20611

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    I see my carb is a 12.5 too… Anyone have a 8.5 they’re willing to sell? (Just the venturi body…)

    #20614

    Rob Kozakowski
    Participant

    You guys have more options in the US than us in Canada.  For us, it’s Rotax or 4-stroke.  And if you go Rotax, it’s pretty much all by the book – which means updates – even for most club racing.

    #20623

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    Sounds like you guys need to start Club 100 / National 100 class… Or a NordAm… 125 DD.

    Don’t forget to send me that helmet, bud…. ttyl.

    #20706

    Joe Bowen
    Participant

    Reading this has me concerned cause i bought a kart as a newbie. I only paid $800 for the kart ready to run with the Rotax but i already knew of some upgrades i need. New seat, Rear bumper and legal tires (Mojo D2) being new to this i jumped all over buying the kart not realizing all these upgrades might be mandatory! I’m assuming my kart is out of date cause  the airbox is the square looking style not the rounded style like i see in pictures of newer karts. Hope this doesnt cost me too much $$$$ or i might be better off buying a different kart. Guess i need to get it to the local kart shop so i know what to expect instead of being surprised when i show up to the track :(

    #20711

    andy-graham
    Participant

    can someone post the RMax rule that requires the newer style (`09+) cylinders…all I can find with regard to “legal” cylinders in the rules speaks to casting #s, cant find anything that addresses year of production….maybe it was an update that I can’t find.  Here’s what I did find in the RMC Rules 2013 Bulletin 1….

    “9.1.5) Cylinder:
    a) Light-alloy-cylinder with GILNISIL-plating. Any re-plating of cylinder is not allowed.
    b) Cylinder with one main exhaust port.
    c) Maximum bore of cylinder = 54,035 mm (measured 10 mm above the exhaust port).
    d) Cylinder has to be marked with the “ROTAX” logo (see pictures below).
    e) 125 Junior MAX: Cylinder without pneumatic timed exhaust valve. Cylinder has to be marked either with identification code 223 999, 223 998 or 223 994

    f) 125 MAX: Cylinder with pneumatic timed exhaust valve. Cylinder has to be marked either identification code 223 997, 223 996 or 223 993

    #20770

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    I can make out a ???997 on my cylinder, so I assume it’s legal….phew!!

    I was told by my local shop that the airbox is around 170, the clutch update around 550, cost to update arond 900 if cylinder’s good, cost to reseal, and refresh, around 1400 on a 900 base price, for a total of 2500 for a fresh, legal, sealed, certified engine. Considering that the price of a new RMax is 3635, I think that’s still a decent deal…

    #20846

    Mike Lyda
    Participant

    Ted –  check your private messages…

    #20962

    Joe Bowen
    Participant

    Where exactly are these numbers located on the cylinder?

    #20970

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    Mine are near the gearbox oil fill, almost impossible to read, on the side of the intake plenum.

    #20980

    andy-graham
    Participant

    You can see the rules with pics at gorotax.com, it shows the casting # location in a pic….and it is right behind the oil fill/vent.

    #21790

    Brian Spek
    Participant

    Any reason you cannot run it as-is in the TAG class there?

    #21804

    Ted Hamilton
    Participant

    Brian — now that I’ve sold it, that would be the limiting factor. :) I’m going to be running TaG with a different powerplant and/or KT-100. GoPro Motorplex has a bunch of NASCAR drivers and/or their progeny and FWT racers and generally isn’t just a bunch of club racers having competitive fun. I was advised that the KT-100 class is more along those lines, though slower, of course. And I’m getting a push-button Leopard on an Extreme chassis for $700, so I’ll do TaG once that’s refreshed. Cheers,
    ~Ted

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