Home Forums Chassis & Handling Seat Position, Weight Distribution, and the lack of scales.

This topic contains 19 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  TJ Koyen 3 months ago.

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  • #5801

    Jeremy Ellison
    Participant

    I’m repositioning the seat on my kart. I don’t have a proper set of scales, but I know the seat needs to be moved forward (for comfort and weight distribution). I have one (1) bathroom scale, I sort of envision making 4 platforms of equal height and rolling the kart on and off the scale on each corner (with me in it, and the aid of a helper), to determine weight. I guess I have a few questions.

    1. What is the ‘proper’ weight distribution (I have heard 40/60 F/R)? And in that same vein, how important is comfort relative to weight distribution? I’d be tempted to optimize around weight and drive with my knees near my ears if need be…

    2. Is my method of using one scale and rolling the kart on and off reasonable as a cost saving measure? Or should I just invest in 4 bathroom type scales?

    Currently running a Sonik TX on an old (’99) Top Kart chassis and just running practice days. Hoping to switch to a KT-100 and running it at a club level.

    #5803

    Ray Lovestead
    Participant

    I’ve got four bathroom scales and I used them.. once.  If I could do it again, I would have gone to my local kart shop and used their scales.  The only time you’d ever use them again would be after a good crash to check to see if you bent the chassis.

    Ray

    #5806

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    1. Most manufacturers will list the proper weight distribution for their chassis’.  40/60 to 43/57 is common.  Thats a good starting point, then let the handling and stopwatch be the guide.

    2.  Go ahead and buy 4 bathroom scales.  You really need to have all four wheels scaled simultainiously.  Bathroom scales are a good starter set-up, but know they will not be 100% accurate.  Calibration from scale to scale, and accuracy as weight is added tend to be “fuzzy”.  With that in mind – go cheap with a bathroom scale.  I’m talking $10-15 apiece cheap.  If you’re spending more, go with a shipping scale (@ $50-ish apeice).  Next step would be used racing scales at $400-700 a set.  Finally new racing scales at $700-1500 a set.

    So for a karter new to scales, a bathroom scale set will intro you to scaling, get you in the ballpark, and show any gross weight issues.  Also get a nice 4′ level and a dozen 1’x1′ floor tiles to level the scales on your floor. 

    Don’t even begin to think the bathroom scale set-up is scientific.  Its not.  Thats why the racing scales cost so much – accuracy.  Just assume each scale is accurate to within +/- 3lbs, and your total class weight is +/- 15lbs.  In other words don’t think your total is making you class legal!  Also, to check for consistancy, after you weight the kart, rotate the scales so each is under a different corner of the kart and double check the weights.  Doing this a few times will reveal if you have a scale way off from the rest.

    Good luck.

    #5872

    Brian Degulis
    Participant

    You’ve got to use 4 scales and they have to be level. Putting one wheel at a time on a single scale won’t work. With 4 $15 Walmart dial type scales I’ve been witin 2 pounds of real kart scales.

     

    Brian

    #5875

    Roberto Perez
    Participant

    Jeremy,   go to your nearest shop and have them scale the kart,  some shops they will let you use their scales for free ………….

     

     

    #6039

    Jeremy Ellison
    Participant

    Thanks for the responses. I’ll call the local shop and see if I can use their scales. I’ve been eyeing a set of race car scales already (lever type, using bathroom scales), so I may just pull the trigger and use those for the kart as well.

    #6722

    Rick Brown
    Participant

    You’ve got to use 4 scales and they have to be level. Putting one wheel at a time on a single scale won’t work. With 4 $15 Walmart dial type scales I’ve been witin 2 pounds of real kart scales.

    Brian

    Same here! Then I returned l the scales and got my $ back

    #6754

    Tim Koyen
    Participant

    One more thing to keep in mind is that you may not want the exact same weight distribution in Yamaha as you would in Tag.  Usually you’ll want the rear a little higher in the Tag to keep more weight on the rear tires, but this can also fall to driver preference.

    #6758

    Jeremy Ellison
    Participant

    Rick, I like that idea :). I think I’m going to buy a set of lever type scales for the car, then I can just use the scales without the lever extensions for the kart as well.

    Tim, thanks for the info. I have a TAG on it now, but am seriously considering a switch to KT-100 (can) for several reasons (maintenance, cost, driver development).

    P.S. I got a KartLift (Pro model) along with my kart. It’s freaking awesome. Great design, excellent execution.

    #6827

    Tim Koyen
    Participant

    P.S. I got a KartLift (Pro model) along with my kart. It’s freaking awesome. Great design, excellent execution.

     

    Thanks!  Glad to hear.

    #9709

    John Savage
    Participant

    You don’t need scales, just get a length of 6 inch plastic drainpipe and a tape measure

    http://www.karting.co.uk/Notice/Message.asp?FID=2&MsgID=0000505043

     

    #9768

    Adi Rock
    Participant

    Sound like more work, no?

    #9806

    Eric Alexander
    Participant

    Less money = more work. ;-)

    #9885

    Adi Rock
    Participant

    Always the case.. :)

    #27162

    Jackson Smith
    Participant

    Why not you search on amazon and ebay because you can easily get cheap bathroom scales there. There are many local company that offering best balance scales  at really cheap price with different features.

    #28662

    Jackson Smith
    Participant

    You can easily find best way if you search on Google. Because there are many experts that are taking about these scale and balances. And hope you get solution of your problem there.

    #28997

    John Savage
    Participant

    Takes at least 5mins from start to finish

    You can be all done and finished before the next man has set up his scales!

    #31205

    Aldus Rodriguez
    Participant

    HELP!!!

    I have a problem with my crg gokart. I’m 6’3 and weight 175 pounds, I can barely fit in the kart, my knee is too close to the shifter so I can’t shift the kart and my seat is touching the ground. I already spend like 5 K and I haven’t been available to drive the kart . It really sucks.

    I need seat dimensions for a tall person, any help will be great thanks

    #31213

    Mike D’Ambrogia
    Participant

    sounds like you need to move the seat back Aldus.  I’m new to the sport, but I don’t think that there are “seat dimensions” for you – it becomes a drivers preference thing.

    My understanding is that you move the seat to where it is comfortable for you, mount it, then scale it to understand the weight distribution.  If moving the seat back puts too much weight in the rear then use weights in the front to regain the desired F/R L/R balance.  Seems most people strive for 50/50 bias left to right, and then 52-ish/48-ish rear to front as a general rule, and then drive it for awhile and change up as more is learned.

    But if you can’t fit your butt in the kart then that is the first problem to solve, tune the chassis out once you get the seat positioned and mounted to your driving preference.  I’m mounting my seat today as well so this is a timely subject for me, I’m 6’3 and 235 so I’m imagining that I’ll have a big task in front of me too

    #31236

    TJ Koyen
    Participant

    Seat position is the number one most important thing in terms of chassis handling and dynamics. Most major manufacturers have a seating chart to give measurements based on your height. These measurements are designed not only to give you optimum weight distribution but also accommodate varying size drivers.

    First and foremost, you set the seat where the manufacturer tells you. This is your priority to get the kart to handle. However, since everyone is different sized, you might need to move it slightly to get comfortable. My thought is always set it where it’s supposed to be and if it’s slightly off but still driveable, the driver has to live with it. If it’s way off and makes the kart undriveable (your legs hit the wheel or your arms don’t reach or something) then you obviously need to adjust it to make sure you can drive.

    Unfortunately I don’t have a seating chart for the CRG. Here is the Tony Kart one:

    As you can see, it only goes up to 190cm (about 6’1″). Any taller and you might want to consider an extended front porch setup for your kart to get your legs stretched out a bit more.

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