Home Forums General Karting Discussion Safety Equipment

This topic contains 6 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  David Cole 9 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #77863

    William Weiler
    Participant

    What is your opinion on safety equipment for a new LO206 racer? I wonder if spending more on a neck brace, suit, rib protector and chest protector is 100% necessary, yet since I am over 50, I am concerned an injury will be more serious if it happens. What do you think?

    TonyKart 401s LO206
    Masters Class
    Morgan Hill, CA

    #77864

    FREDDY SANDOVAL
    Participant

    Elbow pads, a good set of karting gloves that cover your wrists ( try to get a good name brand) They are expensive for a reason, you’ll love them

    A lot of people like the Freem, but Alpine, Sparco and other good names are real good.

    You may not need chest protector, but you’ll be safer if you can get one.

    You can consider knee padding but may be too bulky at the fuel tank area.

    Just survive and don’t crash. Lol

    http://www.accelerationkarting.com/evsr4kracecollar.aspx

    http://www.accelerationkarting.com/freemspidertouchgloves.aspx

    http://www.fastech-racing.com/freem-spider-touch-karting-gloves-black.html

    http://www.accelerationkarting.com/sparcoarrowkglove.aspx

     

     

     

     

     

    #77866

    tony zambos
    Participant

    +1 on Freddy’s comment. The suit needs to be abrasion resistant. A neck brace, very good idea. Rib protection is a must a long with a properly fitting seat. After a trip to the track, think about knee pads. And don’t go super cheap on a helmet.

    LAD Specialties / tony kart / rotax / kt100

    #77875

    Craig Drabik
    Participant

    Suit designed for karting – as others have said it must be abrasion resistant.  Same for gloves.  A rib vest is a good idea.  You might be able to get away without it in LO206 if the track and curbs are smooth, but rib injuries are common, painful, and take a long time to heal.

    Neck braces may be mandatory – check your rules!  I’ve never been a fan of the foam donut neck collars.  I think they’re probably worthless in a rollover except to stop your helmet cracking your collarbones.  I’ve used the EVS brace for years, but there are others out there at various price points.

    #77876

    Tim Landon
    Participant

    Wow, after reading this post, I am amazed that back in day we survived at all.  We didnt have nerf bars.  We wore open face helmets and a jacket, maybe gloves, maybe not.  Oh I know, we knew not to bang or interlock wheels or you would get hurt.  It was called clean racing, respectful passing, etc.

     

    #77877

    Patrick Roth
    Participant

    For a new racer at an “advanced” age, the rib protector is probably the most important piece of safety equipment because it’s the most likely injury you could have (don’t go cheap on this).  A lot of people in the sport go through rib related injuries and they are miserable (voice of experience).  IMO, the neck brace and chest protector are a question of how risk adverse you are.  I started with a $400 Leatt brace because I was planning to do high speed road course stuff and I felt this was necessary but I found myself doing only sprint racing and am comfortable with a foam donut.  I have never worn or considered a chest protector, elbow and/or knee pads.  I did wear one elbow pad when I was racing shifters as my elbow kept hitting the motor.

    Outside of the safety aspect, I suggest spending a little extra on gloves and shoes because of the durability factor.  I started off cheap and found myself replacing these items in less than 6 months because they fell apart (I now run Sparco shoes and gloves).  A cheaper suit should be just fine for a while as they don’t take too much abuse.  A M rated helmet should work just fine unless you are planning to test this at speeds higher than what a typical motorcycle incident might happen at.

    In the end, buck up for the rib protector and then go with what fits your budget and makes you sleep better at night.

    #77894

    David Cole
    Keymaster

    K1 RaceGear has a lot of options for you to select from for suits/gloves/shoes.

    Bell Racing is among the best helmets in motorsports, and you certainly want to protect your head no matter what you are doing.

    You want to make sure you have the required safety equipment that your club/track or series has stated in their rulebook.

    David Cole - EKN Managing Editor

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