Home Forums General Karting Discussion Looking to buy a Kart

This topic contains 21 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Jim Derrig 1 year ago.

Viewing 22 posts - 1 through 22 (of 22 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #57305

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    Lookimg for some information on where to start. I rode a buddy of mines shifter Kart tonight with an 80cc motor. Long story short is I fell in love with it. Where would be a good start in finding a kart that suits what I want to do with it and learn more about these machines. I’m a complete newbie and have some questions to ask and looking for input. Please be easy on me as I’m a beginner and this site was recommended to me by a friend that used to race karts. I’m on the hunt for a Kart and don’t know where to start my search.

    #57307

    Dan Schlosser
    Participant

    Hey Brian – welcome to the sport! Where are you located? That’s usually the best first step toward finding out information.

    #57308

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    I’m located in northern GA Cartesville to be exact. And I’ll gladly take all the help I can get. I just really don’t even know what questions to ask as I don’t know anything about this except we chewed thru some tires and I loved it. I haven’t had that much fun in a long long time. Mainly looking to find a decent starter rig and how to go about finding one. The one I rode was an 80cc shifter Kart with some sort of dirt bike motor, what brand of motor I’m not sure as I didn’t ask. Any guidance appreciated.

    #57310

    Dan Schlosser
    Participant

    The 80cc shifters are a little trickier to find but they are usually pretty reasonable. Maybe a little less supported but like you said, they are dirt bike engines and Honda/Yamaha/Suzuki/etc aren’t really going anywhere soon. I’d be more careful with the chassis so you don’t find yourself with something that parts are hard to find.

    I believe there is a shop at Atlanta Motorsports Park. Joey at the Carolina Motorsports Track is a great resource as are the guys at KartSport in Mooresville, NC.

    Might find it easier to find a 125 shifter – they are more plentiful. Most of us will tell you that shifters aren’t a good starting place but if you are just going out to have fun more so than race you should be fine. If you have general mechanical aptitude you’ll figure out the basics in a hurry.

    Can also check out kartsale and kartingsource for additional equipment for sale but here at EKN is always the most active marketplace in karting.

     

    #57311

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    Yes sir I do not intend on racing, this is basically just something to have where me and my buddies can have some fun in our large parking lot at our shop and go between the buildings instead of taking the golf cart or our personal vehicles. I’m only looking for something for having fun. A 125cc would be just fine, and that’s exactly the information I’m looking for is finding something that isn’t obsolete or a piece of junk. Just because it runs doesn’t make it nice in my opinion. I’m not looking to buy a race ready rig but more so a rig just to go have some fun in the evenings. Is there a brand or type of these Karts that are more of a beginner kart or leisure kart that can be built upon and upgraded?

    #57320

    Dan Schlosser
    Participant

    I saw a Tony Kart shifter on the Charlotte Craigslist listings for $1700. Pretty fair deal.

    #57329

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    Man I been looking all day and haven’t found much. I need to broaden my search. Would be awesome if there was a way to narrow down Karts that were closer to me in the classifieds some how. I don’t mind traveling a decent little way to buy something for the right deal.

    #57330

    Richard Gordon
    Participant

    Here is one near you that is awesome. These motors kick butt. Not a shifter, but fast and the motors require a lot less work overall. http://atlanta.craigslist.org/nat/mcy/5282472621.html

    #57331

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    I actually saw that but I don’t know enough about these to know the difference. If they aren’t shifters are they still as fast? What’s the big differences between the two?

    #57334

    William Martin
    Participant

    Here is one near you that is awesome. These motors kick butt. Not a shifter, but fast and the motors require a lot less work overall. http://atlanta.craigslist.org/nat/mcy/5282472621.html

    Maybe not a shifter, but 45hp and no front brakes sounds a bit dodgy to me. It’s also a rather old chassis, note the “breadbox” side pods, that went obsolete in 2003…

     

    #57336

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    I’d say my buddies is fairly old also, just going off the looks alone. But his runs very well. I would love to find an older one that is in good shape and still runs well and just kind of fix it up with some new parts. I’m not trying to race it or spend the money for a modern race ready rig as Im just looking to have some fun.  This has been a lot harder than I thought it would be.

    #57339

    Richard Gordon
    Participant

    Just pull up a video of Biland SA250. You will want one. These go about 300 hours before needing refresh. Adjust the valves every 30. In stock form have around 30 hp but have a very wide power band. Also runs on pump gas. Water cooled, dry sump 4 stroke bliss. Engine was originally designed for hybrid cars.

    #57340

    Walt Gifford
    Participant

    Just a little something you might want to know. If you’re running around a parking lot and in between buildings at racing speeds you can very easily be killed in a kart especially if you and your buddies have been hitting a few beers and aren’t wearing helmets. These things are dangerous.

    Gif

    FAA certified jet engine and aircraft technician,
    Nicholson Speedway class champion 2001,
    Yamaha KT100 Service Center,
    41 years karting experience

    #57342

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    We were wearing our helmets, rib protectors, and fire suits. I didn’t mention were a full race shop with many years of experience in road racing.  We’re not just a group of morons that hop in something and take off like we’re riding a lawn mower.

    #57423

    Jim Derrig
    Participant

    Brian, what’s your budget?  You probably know that speed costs money.  If your budget is $5000 it’s a lot easier for you to locate something suitable than if your budget is $1500.

    #57431

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    Well the 2 buddies that have them already I guess have older rigs that happen to still run very good and we’re all mechanics so we tend to keep things running good. One spent $1000.00 on his older 80cc kart and my other buddy spent $1500.00 on his 125cc kart. I was hoping to stay around that range. I don’t really know how to explain it other than I’m not looking for a really new kart or one that is set up with a lot of high dollar parts. I’m basically looking for possibly an older kart that still runs good that I can upgrade. Would like to stay around the $1500.00 range if possible. I know it’s not an easy thing to do possibly. I mean their karts may be older and slow as molasses compared to today’s standards but to us they seem pretty dang fast and are a lot of fun for us.

    #57432

    Hans Mattes
    Participant

    Brian, I think you’re on target for a lot of fun.  A buddy of mine (age 65) and I (age 72) bought older TAG karts with pre-09 Leopard motors earlier this year and have been running them, almost once a week, at the local kart track (Sears Point/Infineon/Sonoma Raceway).  We both have road race cars (he an old tube-framed Trans Am and me an old Radical), but find the karting as much fun and far more accessible and less expensive.  Two suggestions: 1) try to find a full outfit (kart, tools, spares, etc.) from someone leaving karting or, at least, changing classes, and 2) find a kart track.  It will be safer, more challenging, and easier to track your times and your inevitable improvement.

    #57434

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    There is a local track in Atlanta but we have a .75 mile track at work at our facility. And then we have a 7 acre asphalt flat pad we use to test and tune the trans am series car and the drift cars we assemble for various racers. We have been setting up cones in our own layout and making that our course. It’s much easier to stay around the house than fight with Atlanta traffic. Lol How much did you pay for your karts Hans?

    #57444

    Hans Mattes
    Participant

    My buddy bought a never-used ’05 Trackmagic with Leopard for $1500.  It had never been assembled correctly (e.g., carb on upside down, brakes non-functional, ill-fitting bolts instead of king pins), and he’s put close to $2000 into support equipment, tools, spares, getting the kart sorted, and adding the requisite MyChron.  I bought an entire kart operation, ’07 Rocket kart (well used, but well set up) with Leopard and LOTS of spares (including a second engine), tools, support equipment and a trailer, for $2000.  Yet I also have put over $500 into setting it up — mainly a highbacked carbon fiber seat and some high-priced foam from Pegasus to hold my aging body in place.  Our after-purchase expenses are only for parts; we both do our own wrenching (on cars as well as karts).  We are several seconds off of competitive times at the Sonoma Raceway kart track, but we can hold our own on practice days and are having a lot of fun — on the cheap (VERY cheap), compared to race cars.

    #57459

    Daniel White
    Participant

    There is a local track in Atlanta but we have a .75 mile track at work at our facility. And then we have a 7 acre asphalt flat pad we use to test and tune the trans am series car and the drift cars we assemble for various racers. We have been setting up cones in our own layout and making that our course. It’s much easier to stay around the house than fight with Atlanta traffic. Lol How much did you pay for your karts Hans?

    Where is this local Atlanta track? I race in Barnesville (an hour south of Atlanta) and Dawsonville (about an hour north of Atlanta).

    #57494

    Brian Bush
    Participant

    I was referring to AMP. Not Atlanta but local to me and our CNC shop in Alpharetta.

    #57512

    Jim Derrig
    Participant

    Okay, but you already know that the cheapest thing about racing is buying the car 😉

    here are some general guidelines:

    1.  Chassis should be year 2003 or newer, as anything older than that gets much harder to find parts for.  Axle size can be 40 or 50mm.

    2.  If you get a shifter, a honda is the preferred motor just because of parts availability for karting applications.

    3.  If you get a single speed, it should be a Rotax or Leopard (IAME/Parrilla) for parts/service availability

    4  In my experience, the hardest thing to find parts for on an older kart is the brakes, as there a dozens of different caliper designs and they all require a different pad size/shape.  You might want to look into that before you buy.

    5.  Most of the stuff on your local craigslist is worn out crap that will not meet items 1-3, but if you look hard and long enough you’ll probably find something.

     

Viewing 22 posts - 1 through 22 (of 22 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Karting's News and Information Leader ekartingnews | an HMG publication